Gardening Thread
(first) 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
 Gardening Thread
Foff
Foff Member (3166posts)
3/14/2008 11:05:00 PM
i'm looking for some advice.

i've successfully grown some veggies in our coastal climate, ie.; basil (in patio containers), potted herbs, zucchini, cucumber, lettuce (spring & fall), any kind of climbing beans.

i'd like to know what other veggies people have grown successfully in our coastal climate and plant accordingly.

thanks in advance.

KungPow
KungPow Raver (23496posts)
3/14/2008 11:17:00 PM
ha ha tant-so-and-so

hey bijou, are we past frost warning yet? Am I safe to do up my containers?

KungPow
KungPow Raver (23496posts)
3/14/2008 11:18:00 PM
Actually, why don't you just come over and do up my patio and I'll knit you some stuff in exchange.

tongue

Bijou_7
Bijou_7 Member (8454posts)
3/17/2008 11:33:00 PM
Xtremely.. I found last summer we didn't get much sun... so cool season crops like spinach did well in my garden, and veggies that take a while to vine ripen (ie. tomatoes) didn't fare as well. This is where a greenhouse would come in very handy.. my coworker gave me a tomato plant that was the same size as his, and while it was still 4" tall in my garden a month later, his greenhouse kept one was bearing fruit. Every plant has a certain quota of 'sunlight hours' it needs to achieve before reaching harvest stage, and for some plants its more than others..

Bijou_7
Bijou_7 Member (8454posts)
3/17/2008 11:36:00 PM
Kung, I planted all my veggies around this time last year and had no problems. I'd just watch the forecast and if there is a frost warning, just mulch your plants with a temporary blanket of leaves..

Lo_Lo
Lo_Lo Member (32133posts)
3/17/2008 11:39:00 PM
I got one of those things with 72 pead pellets or whatever and have all kinds of shyt ready to plant.

that thing is like grade 4 fun watching them grow. big grin

Bijou_7
Bijou_7 Member (8454posts)
3/17/2008 11:54:00 PM
Neat!

I basically did that but in a much more laborious round about way with my foxglove. It's been a whole year since I babied them in their little pots on the window sill.. they were a millimetre tall and now they are basketball sized! Can't wait to see them shoot up flower stalks this year..

Oh and my clematis armandii that i started on the trellis last year is starting to bloom!

proud momma i am.

Lo_Lo
Lo_Lo Member (32133posts)
3/17/2008 11:58:00 PM
I don't know what any of those things are... but I'm sure they are very nice plants. smile

hey... you can maybe tell me: I want to move a fern from the front to the back... can it be done or are they super sensitive? I know you can chop them down to nothing and they'll grow back crazy the next year cuz I ran it over with the lawn mower already by accident twice.

Bijou_7
Bijou_7 Member (8454posts)
3/18/2008 12:45:00 AM
You should be able to move them without a problem as long as you ensure lots of dirt goes with the roots. You can also divide them if you want to keep some in the front.

And you can also propagate them from spores. http://www.anbg.gov.au/ferns/fern.spore.prop.html

Bijou_7
Bijou_7 Member (8454posts)
3/18/2008 1:01:00 AM
Here's a quick synopsis of a Foxglove lifespan:

A pic of what the Foxglove seedlings looked like when I planted them a year ago:



"I love this stage of a plant's life-cycle. It is a fascination for many reasons:

The Digitalis seeds are extremely small and I have a difficult time even seeing them. This is evidenced by my rather sloppy job of seeding. I used tweezers and placed two seeds per pot. But the seeds are so minuscule that I often convinced myself that I'd not "tweezed" anything... and so tweezed another."

...this is how they are now (or more like twice the size of the shovel. They are 'biennial' meaning they spend one year as a plant, one year flowering, and then they die.)



...and this is how they'll look later this summer:




Bijou_7
Bijou_7 Member (8454posts)
3/18/2008 1:07:00 AM
I posted a clematis armandii pic on the first page of this thread last year if you're curious tongue

Bijou_7
Bijou_7 Member (8454posts)
3/18/2008 1:15:00 AM
Another final project pic for my class! I like how it turned out, except its a little bit 'pryde parade' in the colour range.. lol



The tall tree on the left with the light green leaves is a gutta percha (rubber tree), the orange one on the left is a cutleaf Japanese maple, the green leafy thing in the middle foreground an aucuba or azalea, the red one another Japanese maple, the tiny green dots on the right are wild ginger (a groundcover that smells like ginger when you step on it), then a fern (like lolo's?), then a random ball-shaped hedge. lining the patio is red plume grass. the grass by the far waterfall is miscanthus sinensis 'morning light' (6' tall grass.. woo!), the spiky things near the front stairs are yucca or new zealand flax, and the yellow grass by the house foundation are a stipa. and the trees in the background are red elderberry, pacific dogwood and vine maple.

Archon
Archon Member (3463posts)
3/18/2008 5:38:00 AM
Love your drawing.
I dont think a rubber tree is going to grow well in the pacific northwest and I believe they need a mate.

KungPow
KungPow Raver (23496posts)
3/18/2008 6:06:00 AM
lol @ ran over it accidentally with the lawn mower.


Archon
Archon Member (3463posts)
3/18/2008 6:23:00 AM
I'm am trying to grow Lebanon true cedars (Cerdus) from seed with no success. I might have to do a pre cold treatment.

Bijou_7
Bijou_7 Member (8454posts)
3/18/2008 7:52:00 AM
There's a gutta percha doing very well at Van Dusen.. it's maybe 15-20' tall...

Eucommia ulmoides is the one species known as 'hardy rubber tree' that can survive colder climates like ours.

Lo_Lo
Lo_Lo Member (32133posts)
3/18/2008 8:37:00 AM
^^^ twice!

Lo_Lo
Lo_Lo Member (32133posts)
3/18/2008 12:49:00 PM
I planted the sunflowers today cuz they were getting too tall and tangling up.

timed it perfect cuz it started raining the second I was done.

Foff
Foff Member (3166posts)
3/18/2008 2:29:00 PM
yeah, aside form what i mentioned in my earlier post i figure lettuces are always a safe bet in spring and fall on the coast.

i had some gigantic, heirloom tomato plants on my patio last year, but as you say, we just didn't get enough sun/heat to carry them through. as much as i love tomatoes, i don't want to waste the space.

Foff
Foff Member (3166posts)
3/29/2008 12:12:00 AM
i have a sheety little garden plot, with the least amount of light, that requires some intensive TLC (read: weeding) and have decided that i can probably grow more with less effort in containers on my patio.
i'm about to get some pansies (never had them myself, but love that if encouraged, they will flower through until fall), and plant a few of the veggies which have time tested sucessful harvests for me (cucumbers, zuchinni, basil, culinary herbs i.e. lavender, thyme, sage, oregano.
i plan on planting some lettuces in flower boxes in row too, since they don't require deep soil.
can anyone recommend anything else for a patio garden?

Bijou_7
Bijou_7 Member (8454posts)
3/29/2008 12:20:00 AM
for a patio? WATER GARDEN ALL THE WAY!!!

mine was overwintering in the garage, no light, no water change, and all the plants are still alive! i just had to dump out the murky water and refill!

(first) 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Wanna add a comment?

Or Sign up to Clubvibes